Best Indian Books of 2020

20 Best Indian Books of 2020

Last year was amazing but this year we have many new books to look forward too. Get your reading year started with this assortment of 20 Best Indian Books of 2020. We’ve got rounded up a list of 20 best Indian books by best authors of India that have greatly influenced the course of the country’s literature. Best Indian books to read in 2020.

These are the Best Indian Books of 2020

1. Jaipur Journals |Namita Gokhale|

Best Indian Books of 2020

An absolutely gripping and fascinating read! All the characters are unique and their narrative makes Jaipur Journals the perfect representation of colorful and vibrant Jaipur Literature Festival and the many many untold stories in between. Namita Gokhale has brought to life some unforgettable characters like Rudrani who portray the innocent vulnerabilities of human nature. BUYNOW

2. Like Blood on the Bitten TONGUE |Akhil Katyal|

This book is a collection of short stories. Akhil Katyal combines the Urdu and Hindi traditions of poetry writing with English forms and sensibilities. His bittersweet poems are shot through with empathy. In an increasingly cynical world, Katyal’s is a stirring and sincere voice. BUYNOW

3. Poonachi: Lost on the Jungle |Perumal Murugan|

This book narrates the life of a miraculous black goat, who was gifted to an old couple by a mysterious man. You will feel all kinds of emotions while reading this book. This book is available in many other languages. BUYNOW

4. Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line |Deepa Anappara|

This is a well-written account of heartbreaking events seen through the eyes of a nine-year-old child. It manages to convey humour, affection and a sense of humanity in the face of the desperate circumstances it describes. Deepa Anappara is a great storyteller. BUYNOW

5. Low |Jeet Thayil|

Low is beautifully written, intelligent and gripping, and elicits compassion for a character who is pitifully adrift, despite what some might see as his disqualifying privilege. BUYNOW

6. Manto and I |Nandita Das|

Manto and I is about Manto that exists in all of us. Thank you, Nandita for this book and for the film. We need voices who believe in unity than division. We need to believe that we will overcome it. The divide that he tried to bring down through his stories and works must be worked on again with great vigor. BUYNOW

7. Resisting Disappearance |Ather Zia|

This theoretically sophisticated and politically powerful bookmarks a groundbreaking moment in the anthropological study of Kashmir and South Asia that will also make excellent text in undergraduate and graduate seminars on various themes and topics. BUYNOW

8. The Loneliness of Hira Barua |Arupa Kalito|

The English translation of the 2014 Sahitya Akademi Award-winning collection of short stories, originally titled Mariam Austin Othoba Hira Baruah, from one of our leading feminist voices. It “paints powerful portraits of ordinary people, especially women, negotiating their personal lives in times of socio-political strife and turmoil in Assam”. BUYNOW

9. Hijab |Guruprasad Kaginele|

Guruprasad Kaginele, a doctor by profession, has been a prominent voice in contemporary Kannada literature. He has published three short story collections, three novels, and two essay collections. Three Indian doctors find themselves practicing at a hospital in amok, a nondescript town in Minnesota, waiting for their Green cards. What is expected to be an easy practice in a backwater town soon turns into a difficult question about identity, immigration, and belonging, in this award-winning novel first published in Kannada. BUYNOW

10. Amnesty |Aravind Adiga|

The scope and profundity of Victor Hugo, the humor and wit we’ve come to expect from Adiga, and a novel which suggests the impossibility of keeping a sense of the self in a globalized world which either forces assimilation or exile. BUYNOW

11. The Lion of Kashmir |Siddhartha Gigoo|

This is a fiction book. Addicted. It’s too strong a word, but that’s how it’s been written by the author. Some lines are so well versed that you actually read them again and again for your own pleasure. There is a deep meaning attached to the story. BUYNOW

12. Chats with the Dead |Shehan Karuntilaka|

A compulsively readable dark comedy of life-death and everything in between-Chats with the Deadsearingly exposes the plight of a country caught in the aftermath of civil war. Its deliciously compelling absurdity holds you in thrall right from the very first page up to its startling denouement, constantly upending its own premise with its staggering humanity. BUYNOW

13. Victory Colony |Bhaswati Ghosh|

This 1950s-set story speaks of the resilience of refugees from East Pakistan—and specifically of Amala Manna—who found themselves mostly unwanted on either side of the border following Partition. In the face of government apathy and public disdain, they started anew their lives from scratch, and in the process, changed the socio‐cultural landscape of Calcutta, the city they claimed as home, forever. Needless to say, Victory Colony has renewed resonance and significance in our current political climate. BUYNOW

14. Rising Heat |Perumal Murugan|

Murugan’s first novel, which launched a splendid literary career, is a tour de force. Now translated for the first time, it poses powerful questions about the human cost of relentless urbanization in the name of progress. BUYNOW

15. Funeral Nights |Kynpham Singh|

A Khasi man dies. His family and friends gather around for a night of storytelling and legend-sharing—tales that bring together the land and its people. In his first full-length novel, the poet “brings alive the rich and unique culture of the Khasi tribe of Meghalaya in all its beauty, its customs and rituals, and its peculiarities”.BUYNOW

16. Shameless |Taslim Nasreen|


Shameless
, the sequel to the controversial and best-selling Lajja, had never been published in Bengali, or any other language, until very recently, when a Hindi translation was printed. This “timely, topical and outspoken novel about communal tensions in India. BUYNOW

17. Name Place Animal |Daribba Lyndem|

Set in politically charged Shillong, this interconnected collection of stories speaks of the coming-of-age of a young woman–and the city and community she calls home. As “each chapter gently lifts a curtain to reveal glimpses of the protagonist’s Protestant, Khasi life”, we see her cross the threshold from childhood to adulthood. BUYNOW

18. A Thousand Cranes for India |Pallavi Aiyar|

This anthology—comprising 23 pieces of reportage, stories, poems, memoir, and polemic—uses the mythology, history, and symbolism of Japanese Origami paper cranes as a pathway for some of India’s best-known writers, poets, and artists to pave a “shared, civic space for a conversation about the fault lines in India at a time of darkness”.

19. Destination Wedding |Diksha Basu|

Tina wants to feel Indian. Really Indian. She travels to Delhi for a wedding—and to a world of playboys, models, dating agencies for widows, and wedding guests with personal bodyguards—where she is all set to have “an authentic Indian experience”. Now if only someone would tell her what that was… A “sparkling” new novel from the author of the much-loved The Windfall. Part of the best Indian books of 2020 list.

20. A Burning |Megha Majumdar|

For readers of Tommy Orange, Yaa Gyasi, and Jhumpa Lahiri” Majumdar’s debut, a thriller-like epic, centers around three characters who find their lives crisscrossing in the aftermath of a catastrophe. Of A Burning, Amitav Ghosh has said: it’s “the best debut novel I have come across in a long time… In telling the story of a young Muslim girl whose life is undone by a single social media post, it creates a kaleidoscope of contemporary urban India, with its internet-driven hysteria, religious fanaticism, rampant corruption, poisoned air, random violence, enraged mobs, and pervasive misogyny.”

This is the list of Best Indian Books of 2020

About the author

Abhishek Singh

I am a Law student and part-time reader. I love reviewing books and writing the best content for the people. I think everyone should read and I will make sure that everyone knows the importance of books.

View all posts

2 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *